Senior Pet Care

Don’t you wish they could stay young forever?

When my girl, Sascha, developed urethral cancer at 12, I was paralyzed with shock, fear and pain. I had no idea where to turn or what to do for her. Those last six months of Sascha’s life were filled with monitoring her, making sure she was in no pain, taking care to get her in/out of house, avoiding those heart-breaking decisions of what to do next.

 

I had no idea where to turn or what to do for Sascha. After Sascha crossed over, I did quite a bit of research on how to care for a senior pet, hoping to help you help your aging pet. I designed this virtual class, hoping to give you some tools (and, hopefully comfort) to navigate through this difficult and painful time in your pet’s life.

YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR PET IS SPECIAL . . . AND THEIR NEED FOR YOUR SPECIAL CARE INCREASES DURING THEIR SENIOR YEARS

Topics to be discussed:

  • Have you noticed possible behavior changes?
  • Do you see increased/decreased reaction to sounds?
  • Do you know common signs of cancer?
  • Do you recognize the signs of arthritis?
  • What is my pet’s “Quality of Life?
  • Anticipatory Grief, and,
  • The most painful to you: “How will I know when to make the decision to let my pet go?”

Next Zoom Presentation:

Date: Wednesday, November 16, 2022

Time: 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm 

Donation: $10 (your $10 will benefit a pet rescue)

(sorry, no refund)

 

After registering, you will receive a zoom link via email. 

At the conclusion of this program, a pdf copy of this presentation will be emailed to you, including a Quality of Life Scale.

If this date does not work for you, seminar repeated January 18, 2023.

Check back to register for next seminar. 

 

When you see your beloved pet go into a slow decline, I understand how painful it is to determine your next steps

No denying the decision is difficult.  So make a commitment to yourself and promise your pet that their needs will come before your fear of losing them. 

 

Make plans for euthanasia and aftercare ahead of time … it is easier than trying to make these decisions when you are raw with emotions. 

 

WHAT IS NORMAL FOR YOUR PET?

Always remember that you know your pet better than anyone, even better than your veterinarian. So, it is important to recognize and identify any abnormal signs your pet displays. What this means is, that when you notice something “different” with you pet, you immediately get them to your vet. (Don’t wait for that yearly exam.)

 

Remember, some pets, especially cats, will try to hide pain and suffering until the condition becomes severe. Pay attention to subtle behavior changes such as hiding under the bed and not rushing up to greet you when you come home.

TAP INTO ALL YOUR SENSES:

BY LOOKING, LISTENING AND SMELLING, YOU CAN OFTEN CATCH EARLY SIGNS OF ILLNESS OR INJURY.

Smell:

  • Sweet breath may indicate diabetic ketosis,
  • Ears smell like dirty socks ear infection, may signal ear mites

Touch:  Discover hot spots (inflammation) in coat or a stone in paw pad for limp reason; cold spots (poor circulation)

Look:    Asymmetrical pupils could indicate neurological condition

Listen:  Whines versus growls

. . . . to name just a few

No denying the decision is difficult.  So make a commitment to yourself and promise your pet that their needs will come before your fear of losing them.
Think about making a plan for for sending them to the “Rainbow Bridge” ahead of time … it is easier than trying to make this decision when you are raw with emotions.